Mary Lim

Thursday, January 28, 2016

t4: research & quote

Before starting any project, I try to ground myself in the objectives. For this one, it's to break the rules of typography and to illustrate the meaning of the type through image. Generally, the point of this project is to experiment and visualize. Upon first receiving the project brief, I felt as though I had already done this sort of project in sophomore year. However, I chose to take this chance to give myself a challenge and make it harder for myself.

I don't know why, but I do not like the idea of living by an inspirational quote. Maybe it's because most of them are either really corny, really general, or gimmicky one-liners. Not to say there aren't any good quotes out there, there are just a lot of quotes with fluff. I know I need to choose the right quote that is can set myself up for my own take on its meaning.

Possible 7-words-or-less quotes:
"You are what you think."
"Disencumbered"
"What's essential is invisible to the eye."
"Infinity"
Another possible idea is using the words Ed Ruscha (below) used in his single-word series and making them 3-dimensional, or, visualizing them in a different way.



I may go with this quote, "Read this word then read this...," an excerpt from Vito Acconci's "Text." As both poet and fine artist, Acconci was interested in how language takes on meaning and its implications. It's very literal and abstract, but I thought it would be interesting to take on.


OR I might go with "What's essential is invisible to the eye." This has lots of possibilities for my own interpretation of the quote.

OR I may do an onomatopoeia series again (look at previous blog post for Beer Packaging).

This sort of project brings to mind the relationship between text, image, and meaning. While text can anchor or relay images, here text is treated as image or as word within image. How can I stretch, break, or put my own spin on these concepts of text as image/word within image?

Moodboards for different styles

quirky, fun, playful

hand drawn,  cartoon-ish, bright

scientific, precise, complex

three-dimensional








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